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Physiological and Proteomic Adaptation of "Aromatoleum aromaticum" EbN1 to Low Growth Rates in Benzoate-Limited, Anoxic Chemostats

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Trautwein,  K.
Department of Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Lahme,  S.
Department of Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Woehlbrand,  L.
Department of Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Harder,  J.
Department of Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Reinhardt,  R.
Department of Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Rabus,  R.
Department of Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Trautwein, K., Lahme, S., Woehlbrand, L., Feenders, C., Mangelsdorf, K., Harder, J., et al. (2012). Physiological and Proteomic Adaptation of "Aromatoleum aromaticum" EbN1 to Low Growth Rates in Benzoate-Limited, Anoxic Chemostats. Journal of Bacteriology, 194(9), 2165-2180.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-C83D-A
Abstract
“Aromatoleum aromaticum” EbN1 was cultivated at different growth rates in benzoate-limited chemostats under nitrate-reducing conditions. Physiological characteristics, proteome dynamics, phospholipid-linked fatty acid (PLFA) composition, and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) content were analyzed in steady-state cells at low (μlow) (0.036 h−1), medium (μmed) (0.108 h−1), and high (μhigh) (0.180 h−1) growth rates. A positive correlation to growth rate was observed for cellular parameters (cell size, and DNA and protein contents). The free energy consumed for biomass formation steadily increased with growth rate. In contrast, the energy demand for maintenance increased only from μlow to μmed and then remained constant until μhigh. The most comprehensive proteomic changes were observed at μlow compared to μhigh. Uniformly decreased abundances of protein components of the anaerobic benzoyl coenzyme A (benzoyl-CoA) pathway, central carbon metabolism, and information processing agree with a general deceleration of benzoate metabolism and cellular processes in response to slow growth. In contrast, increased abundances were observed at μlow for diverse catabolic proteins and components of uptake systems in the absence of the respective substrate (aromatic or aliphatic compounds) and for proteins involved in stress responses. This potential catabolic versatility and stress defense during slow growth may be interpreted as preparation for future needs.