English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Motility patterns of filamentous sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp.

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons210345

Dunker,  R.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210728

Røy,  H.
HGF MPG Joint Research Group for Deep Sea Ecology & Technology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210496

Kamp,  A.
Permanent Research Group Microsensor, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210489

Jørgensen,  B. B.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

Dunker11.pdf
(Publisher version), 305KB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Dunker, R., Røy, H., Kamp, A., & Jørgensen, B. B. (2011). Motility patterns of filamentous sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp. FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 77(1), 176-185.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-C957-B
Abstract
The large sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp., live on the oxidation of sulfide with oxygen or nitrate, but avoid high concentrations of both sulfide and oxygen. As gliding filaments, they rely on reversals in the gliding direction to find their preferred environment, the oxygen-sulfide interface. We observed the chemotactic patterns of single filaments in a transparent agar medium and scored their reversals and the glided distances between reversals. Filaments within the preferred microenvironment glided distances shorter than their own length between reversals that anchored them in their position as a microbial mat. Filaments in the oxic region above the mat or in the sulfidic, anoxic region below the mat glided distances longer than the filament length between reversals. This reversal behavior resulted in a diffusion-like spreading of the filaments. A numerical model of such gliding filaments was constructed based on our observations. The model was applied to virtual filaments in the oxygen- and sulfide-free zone of the sediment, which is a main habitat of Beggiatoa in the natural environment. The model predicts a long residence time of the virtual filament in the suboxic zone and explains why Beggiatoa accumulate high nitrate concentrations in internal vacuoles as an alternative electron acceptor to oxygen.