English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Response of sulfate-reducing bacteria to an artificial oil-spill in a coastal marine sediment

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons210888

Yarza,  P.
Microbial Genomics Group, Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210234

Arnds,  J.
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210636

Niemann,  H.
HGF MPG Joint Research Group for Deep Sea Ecology & Technology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210230

Amann,  R.
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Suarez-Suarez, A., López-López, A., Tovar-Sánchez, A., Yarza, P., Orfila, A., Terrados, J., et al. (2011). Response of sulfate-reducing bacteria to an artificial oil-spill in a coastal marine sediment. Environmental Microbiology, 13(6), 1488-1499.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-C983-8
Abstract
In situ mesocosm experiments using a calcareous sand flat from a coastal area of the island of Mallorca in the Mediterranean Sea were performed in order to study the response of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to controlled crude oil contamination, or heavy contamination with naphthalene. Changes in the microbial community caused by the contamination were monitored by a combination of comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes, fluorescence in situ hybridization, cultivation approaches and metabolic activity rates. Our results showed that crude oil and naphthalene negatively influenced the total microbial community as the natural increase in cell numbers due to the seasonal dynamics was attenuated. However, both contaminants enhanced the sulfate reduction rates, as well as the culturability of SRB. Our results suggested the presence of autochthonous deltaproteobacterial SRBs that were able to degrade crude oil or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as naphthalene in anaerobic sediment layers.