English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Extremely halophilic microbial communities in anaerobic sediments from a solar saltern

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons210888

Yarza,  P.
Microbial Genomics Group, Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210715

Richter,  M.
Microbial Genomics Group, Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210636

Niemann,  H.
HGF MPG Joint Research Group for Deep Sea Ecology & Technology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210725

Rossello-Mora,  R.
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Lopez-Lopez, A., Yarza, P., Richter, M., Suarez-Suarez, A., Anton, J., Niemann, H., et al. (2010). Extremely halophilic microbial communities in anaerobic sediments from a solar saltern. Environmental Microbiology Reports, 2(2), 258-271.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-CAE6-8
Abstract
The prokaryotic communities inhabiting hypersaline sediments underlying a crystallizer pond of a Mediterranean solar saltern have been studied in a polyphasic approach including 16S rRNA and dsrAB gene libraries analysis [the last encoding for dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase], most probable number of cultivable counts, and metabolic measurements of sulfate reduction. The samples studied here represent one of the most hypersaline anoxic environments sampled worldwide that harbour a highly diverse microbial community different from those previously reported in other hypersaline sediments. Both bacterial and archaeal types are present but, contrarily to the overlying brine system, the former dominates. Molecular analyses indicated that the bacterial fraction is highly diverse and mostly composed by groups related to sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In good agreement with this, sulfate-reducing activity was detected in the sediment, as well as the metabolic diversity within SRB (as indicated by the use of different electron donors in enrichments). On the other hand, the archaeal fraction was phylogenetically homogeneous and, surprisingly, strongly affiliated with the MBSl-1 candidate division, an euryarchaeotal group only reported in deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins of the Western Mediterranean, for which a methanogenic metabolism was hypothesized. The hypersaline studied samples constitute a valuable source of new prokaryotic types with metabolisms adapted to the prevalent in situ extreme conditions.