English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Filamentous sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp., in arctic marine sediments (Svalbard, 79 degrees N)

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons210489

Jørgensen,  B. B.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210345

Dunker,  R.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210420

Grünke,  S.
HGF MPG Joint Research Group for Deep Sea Ecology & Technology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210728

Røy,  H.
HGF MPG Joint Research Group for Deep Sea Ecology & Technology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

Jorgensen10.pdf
(Publisher version), 383KB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Jørgensen, B. B., Dunker, R., Grünke, S., & Røy, H. (2010). Filamentous sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp., in arctic marine sediments (Svalbard, 79 degrees N). FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 73(3), 500-513.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-CAE8-6
Abstract
Fjord sediments on the west coast of the arctic archipelago Svalbard were surveyed to understand whether large filamentous sulfur bacteria of the genus Beggiatoa thrive at seawater temperatures permanently near freezing. Two sediments had abundant populations of Beggiatoa, while at six sites, only sporadic occurrences were observed. We conclude that Beggiatoa, although previously unnoticed, are widespread in these arctic fjord sediments. Beggiatoa ranged in diameter from 2 to 52 microm and, by those tested, stored nitrate in vacuoles at up to 260 mM. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of a 20-microm-wide filament is closely associated with other large, marine, nitrate-storing Beggiatoa. The Beggiatoa mostly occurred in the upper 2-5 cm of oxidized surface sediment between oxygen and the deeper sulfidic zone. In spite of a very low or an undetectable sulfide concentration, sulfate reduction provided abundant H(2)S in this zone. The total living biomass of Beggiatoa filaments at one study site varied over 3 years between 1.13 and 3.36 g m(-2). Because of their large size, Beggiatoa accounted for up to 15% of the total prokaryotic biomass, even though the filament counts at this site were rather low, comprising <1/10,000 of the bacterial numbers on a cell basis.