English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Quantification of pumping rate of Chironomus plumosus larvae in natural burrows

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons210616

Morad,  M. R.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210507

Khalili,  A.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

Morad2010.pdf
(Publisher version), 718KB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Morad, M. R., Khalili, A., Roskosch, A., & Lewandowski, J. (2010). Quantification of pumping rate of Chironomus plumosus larvae in natural burrows. Aquatic Ecology, 44(1), 143-153.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-CB30-4
Abstract
This paper investigates and compares experimentally determined water velocity field above natural macrozoobenthos burrows generated by Chironomus Plumosus larva during their bio-irrigation activity. All experiments were carried out using particle image velocimetry and performed in mesocosms filled with sediment burrowed by larvae, and the water velocity fields near the inlets and outlets of the U-shaped burrows were measured. From water velocity data the average volumetric flow rates between 54.6 and 61.1 mm3/s were calculated. Assuming an average burrow diameter of 2.25 mm, the volumetric flow rates suggest the average flow velocities through burrows during the pumping period between 13.7 and 15.4 mm/s. Two additional interesting phenomena could also be shown by analyzing the flow field generated by the larva. The analysis of the amount of tracers used for visualizations revealed that some of the tracer particles added to the water must have been consumed along their path from the inlet toward the outlet, hinting clearly to the so-called filter-feeding action of C. plumosus. The second phenomenon is due to the form of motion C. plumosus generates. By careful flow visualizations it was found that unlike other organisms such as Urechis caupo that use peristaltic body contractions, C. plumosus worms its body sinusoidally catapulting the fluid far into the overlying water body. This action is of ecological advantage for it avoids generating short oxygen circuits for their respiration and filter feeding.