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TI Nitrite-Driven Anaerobic Methane Oxidation by Oxygenic Bacteria

MPG-Autoren
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Pelletier,  Eric
Department of Symbiosis, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Kuypers,  Marcel M. M.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Schreiber,  Frank
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Zedelius,  Johannes
Department of Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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de Beer,  Dirk
Permanent Research Group Microsensor, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Strous,  Marc
Microbial Fitness Group, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Ettwig, K. F., Butler, M. K., Le Paslier, D., Pelletier, E., Mangenot, S., Kuypers, M. M. M., et al. (2010). TI Nitrite-Driven Anaerobic Methane Oxidation by Oxygenic Bacteria. Nature, 464, 543-600.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-CB86-3
Zusammenfassung
Only three biological pathways are known to produce oxygen: photosynthesis, chlorate respiration and the detoxification of reactive oxygen species.Herewepresent evidence for a fourth pathway, possibly of considerable geochemical and evolutionary importance. The pathway was discovered after metagenomic sequencing of an enrichment culture that couples anaerobic oxidation of methane with the reduction of nitrite to dinitrogen. The complete genome of the dominant bacterium, named ‘CandidatusMethylomirabilis oxyfera’, was assembled. This apparently anaerobic, denitrifying bacterium encoded, transcribed and expressed the well-established aerobic pathway for methane oxidation, whereas it lacked known genes for dinitrogen production. Subsequent isotopic labelling indicated that ‘M. oxyfera’ bypassed the denitrification intermediate nitrous oxide by the conversion of two nitric oxidemolecules to dinitrogen and oxygen,whichwas used to oxidizemethane.These results extend our understanding of hydrocarbon degradation under anoxic conditions and explain the biochemical mechanism of a poorly understood freshwater methane sink. Because nitrogen oxides were already present on early Earth, our finding opens up the possibility that oxygen was available to microbial metabolism before the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis.