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Journal Article

Effects of deposition of heavy-metal-polluted harbor mud on microbial diversity and metal resistance in sandy marine sediments

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Finke,  N.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Muyzer,  G.
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Toes, A. C. M., Finke, N., Kuenen, J. G., & Muyzer, G. (2008). Effects of deposition of heavy-metal-polluted harbor mud on microbial diversity and metal resistance in sandy marine sediments. Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, 55(3), 372-385.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-CD24-0
Abstract
Deposition of dredged harbor sediments in relatively undisturbed ecosystems is often considered a viable option for confinement of pollutants and possible natural attenuation. This study investigated the effects of deposition of heavy-metal-polluted sludge on the microbial diversity of sandy sediments during 12 months of mesocosm incubation. Geochemical analyses showed an initial increase in pore-water metal concentrations, which subsided after 3 months of incubation. No influence of the deposited sediment was observed in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles of bacterial 16S rRNA genes, whereas a minor, transient impact on the archaeal community was revealed. Phylogenetic analyses of bacterial 16S rRNA clone libraries showed an abundance of members of the Flavobacteriaceae, the α- and γ-Proteobacteria, in both the muddy and the sandy sediments. Despite the finding that some groups of clones were shared between the metal-impacted sandy sediment and the harbor control, comparative analyses showed that the two sediments were significantly different in community composition. Consequences of redeposition of metal-polluted sediment were primarily underlined with cultivation-dependent techniques. Toxicity tests showed that the percentage of Cd- and Cu-tolerant aerobic heterotrophs was highest among isolates from the sandy sediment with metal-polluted mud on top.