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Journal Article

Video-supported analysis of Beggiatoa filament growth, breakage, and movement

MPS-Authors
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Kamp,  A.
Permanent Research Group Microsensor, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Roy,  H.
HGF MPG Joint Research Group for Deep Sea Ecology & Technology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Schulz-Vogt,  H. N.
Ecophysiology Group, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Kamp, A., Roy, H., & Schulz-Vogt, H. N. (2008). Video-supported analysis of Beggiatoa filament growth, breakage, and movement. Microbial Ecology, 56(3), 484-491.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-CD32-0
Abstract
A marine Beggiatoa sp. was cultured in semi-solid agar with opposing oxygen-sulfide gradients. Growth pattern, breakage of filaments for multiplication, and movement directions of Beggiatoa filaments in the transparent agar were investigated by time-lapse video recording. The initial doubling time of cells was 15.7 ± 1.3 h (mean ± SD) at room temperature. Filaments grew up to an average length of 1.7 ± 0.2 mm, but filaments of up to approximately 6 mm were also present. First breakages of filaments occurred approximately 19 h after inoculation, and time-lapse movies illustrated that a parent filament could break into several daughter filaments within a few hours. In >20% of the cases, filament breakage occurred at the tip of a former loop. As filament breakage is accomplished by the presence of sacrificial cells, loop formation and the presence of sacrificial cells must coincide. We hypothesize that sacrificial cells enhance the chance of loop formation by interrupting the communication between two parts of one filament. With communication interrupted, these two parts of one filament can randomly move toward each other forming the tip of a loop at the sacrificial cell.