English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

From the Namibian and Oregon coast upwelling systems and their cross-comparison with planctomycete genomes

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons210875

Woebken,  D.
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210812

Teeling,  H.
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210849

Wecker,  P.
Microbial Genomics Group, Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210536

Kostadinov,  I.
Microbial Genomics Group, Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210230

Amann,  R.
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210403

Glockner,  F. O.
Microbial Genomics Group, Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Woebken, D., Teeling, H., Wecker, P., Dumitriu, A., Kostadinov, I., DeLong, E. F., et al. (2007). From the Namibian and Oregon coast upwelling systems and their cross-comparison with planctomycete genomes. The ISME Journal, 1(5), 419-435.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-CE0A-D
Abstract
Planctomycetes are widely distributed in marine environments, where they supposedly play a role in carbon recycling. To deepen our understanding about the ecology of this sparsely studied phylum six planctomycete fosmids from two marine upwelling systems were investigated and compared with all available planctomycete genomic sequences including the as yet unpublished near-complete genomes of Blastopirellula marina DSM 3645T and Planctomyces maris DSM 8797T. High numbers of sulfatase genes (41–109) were found on all marine planctomycete genomes and on two fosmids (2). Furthermore, C1 metabolism genes otherwise only known from methanogenic Archaea and methylotrophic Proteobacteria were found on two fosmids and all planctomycete genomes, except for ‘Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis’. Codon usage analysis indicated high expression levels for some of these genes. In addition, novel large families of planctomycete-specific paralogs with as yet unknown functions were identified, which are notably absent from the genome of ‘Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis’. The high numbers of sulfatases in marine planctomycetes characterizes them as specialists for the initial breakdown of sulfatated heteropolysaccharides and indicate their importance for recycling carbon from these compounds. The almost ubiquitous presence of C1 metabolism genes among Planctomycetes together with codon usage analysis and information from the genomes suggest a general importance of these genes for Planctomycetes other than formaldehyde detoxification. The notable absence of these genes in Candidatus K. stuttgartiensis plus the surprising lack of almost any planctomycete-specific gene within this organism reveals an unexpected distinctiveness of anammox bacteria from all other Planctomycetes.