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Journal Article

Exploring subseafloor life with the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

MPS-Authors
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Inagaki,  Fumio
Permanent Research Group Microsensor, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;
Microbial Habitat Group, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Ferdelman,  Tim
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Jørgensen,  Bo Barker
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Fulltext (public)

Ferdelmann7.pdf
(Publisher version), 365KB

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Citation

D´Hondt, S., Inagaki, F., Ferdelman, T., Jørgensen, B. B., Kato, K., Kemp, P., et al. (2007). Exploring subseafloor life with the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Scientific Drilling, 5(September), 26-37.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-CED4-8
Abstract
Deep drilling of marine sediments and igneous crust offers a unique opportunity to explore how life persists and evolves in the Earth’s deepest subsurface ecosystems. Resource availability deep beneath the seafloor may impose constraints on microbial growth and dispersal patterns that differ greatly from those in the surface world. Processes that mediate microbial evolution and diversity may also be very different in these habitats, which approach and probably pass the extreme limits of life. Communities in parts of the deep subsurface may resemble primordial microbial ecosystems, and may serve as analogues of life on other planetary bodies, such as Mars or Europa, that have or once had water.