English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Manganese(II) oxidation driven by lateral oxygen intrusions in the western Black Sea

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons210750

Schippers,  A.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210631

Neretin,  L. N.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210568

Lavik,  G.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Schippers, A., Neretin, L. N., Lavik, G., Leipe, T., & Pollehne, F. (2005). Manganese(II) oxidation driven by lateral oxygen intrusions in the western Black Sea. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 69(9), 2241-2252.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-D031-C
Abstract
Mn(II) oxidation in the suboxic zone of the water column was studied at four stations in the western Black Sea. We measured Mn(II) oxidation rates using 54Mn tracer and tested the hypothesis of alternative oxidants for Mn(II) other than dissolved oxygen. In anoxic incubation experiments with water from different depths of the chemocline, Mn(II) was not oxidized by nitrite, nitrate, or iodate. In the presence of light, Mn(II) also was not oxidized under anoxic conditions as well. Anaerobic Mn(II) oxidizing microorganisms could not be enriched. In oxic incubation experiments, the addition of alternative oxidants did not significantly increase the Mn(II) oxidation rate. The lack of an anaerobic Mn(II) oxidation in our experiments does not unambiguously prove the absence of anaerobic Mn(II) oxidation in the Black Sea but suggests that dissolved oxygen is the only oxidant for biologically catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation. Lateral intrusions of modified Bosphorus water were shown to be the main mechanism providing dissolved oxygen in the suboxic and the upper anoxic zones and explaining observed Mn(II) oxidation rates. Maximum in situ Mn(II) oxidation rates in the suboxic zone were 1.1 nM Mn(II) per h in the central Black Sea, 25 nM Mn(II) per h on the Romanian continental slope and 60 nM Mn(II) per h on the Anatolian continental slope. These rates correlate with the amount of particulate Mn and the number of Mn-oxide particles and are in agreement with rates measured 13 yr before. Our study highlights the importance of lateral intrusions of oxygen for the ventilation of the suboxic zone and the anoxic interior and for the regulation of different oxidation-reduction processes in the chemocline, including Mn(II) oxidation, which may be significant for other anoxic basins as well.