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Journal Article

A high-pressure thermal gradient block for investigating microbial activity in multiple deep-sea samples

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Kallmeyer,  J.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Ferdelman,  T. G.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Jørgensen,  B. B.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Kallmeyer, J., Ferdelman, T. G., Jansen, K. H., & Jørgensen, B. B. (2003). A high-pressure thermal gradient block for investigating microbial activity in multiple deep-sea samples. Journal of Microbiological Methods, 55(1), 165-172.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-D1ED-8
Abstract
Details about the construction and use of a high-pressure thermal gradient block for the simultaneous incubation of multiple samples are presented. Most parts used are moderately priced off-the-shelf components that easily obtainable. In order to keep the pressure independent of thermal expansion of the sample vessels, a back-pressure system with a constant leak rate was installed. Pressure is applied through high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) pumps that run in constant pressure mode with variable flow rate, thereby regulating any pressure fluctuations. The device allows incubations along a wide range of temperatures and pressures and can easily be modified to accommodate different experiments, either biological or chemical. As an application, we present measurements of bacterial sulfate reduction rates in hydrothermal sediments from Guyamas Basin over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. Sulfate reduction rates increase with increasing pressure and show maximum values at pressures higher than in situ.