English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Enhanced productivity led to increased organic carbon burial in the euxinic North Atlantic basin during the late Cenomanian oceanic anoxic event

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons210556

Kuypers,  M. M. M.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

Kuypers2.pdf
(Publisher version), 516KB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Kuypers, M. M. M., Pancost, R. D., Nijenhuis, I. A., & Damsté, J. S. S. (2002). Enhanced productivity led to increased organic carbon burial in the euxinic North Atlantic basin during the late Cenomanian oceanic anoxic event. Paleoceanography, 17(4): 1051, pp. 1051-1051.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-D2CD-B
Abstract
[1] Three Cenomanian/Turonian (C/T, similar to93.5 Ma) black shale sections along a northeast-southwest transect in the southern part of the proto-North Atlantic Ocean were correlated by stable carbon isotope stratigraphy using the characteristic excursion in delta(13)C values of both bulk organic matter (OM) and molecular fossils of algal chlorophyll and steroids. All three sites show an increase in marine organic carbon (OC) accumulation rates during the C/T Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE). The occurrence of molecular fossils of anoxygenic photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria, lack of bioturbation, and high abundance of redox sensitive trace metals indicate sulfidic conditions, periodically reaching up into the photic zone before as well as during the C/T OAE. During the C/T OAE, there was a significant rise of the chemocline as indicated by the increase in concentrations of molecular fossils of green sulfur bacteria and Mo/Al ratios. The presence of molecular fossils of the green strain of green sulfur bacteria indicates that euxinic conditions periodically even occurred at very shallow water depths of 15 m or less during the C/T OAE. However, bottom water conditions did not dramatically change as indicated by more or less constant V/Al and Zn/Al ratios at site 367. This suggests that the increase in OC burial rates resulted from enhanced primary productivity rather than increased anoxia, which is supported by stable carbon isotopic evidence and a large increase in Ba/Al ratios during the C/T OAE. The occurrence of the productivity event during a period of globally enhanced organic carbon burial rates (i.e., the C/T OAE) points to a common cause possibly related to the formation of a deep water connection between North and South Atlantic basins.