English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

The Chlorin-Index: A new parameter for organic matter freshness in sediments

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons210765

Schubert,  C. J.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210517

Klockgether,  G.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210637

Niggemann,  J.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210363

Ferdelman,  T. G.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210489

Jørgensen,  B. B.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

Niggemann5.pdf
(Publisher version), 294KB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Schubert, C. J., Klockgether, G., Niggemann, J., Ferdelman, T. G., & Jørgensen, B. B. (2002). The Chlorin-Index: A new parameter for organic matter freshness in sediments. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 66(15A Suppl. 1), A689-A689.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-D2ED-7
Abstract
Total chlorins, comprising degradation products of chlorophyll, have been used recently to reconstruct paleoproductivity from marine sediment cores. Here, we report on a new index, the Chlorin Index (CI), that proves to be a helpful tool for rapidly estimating organic matter freshness in marine sediments. The CI is a ratio between the fluorescence intensity of a sediment extracted with acetone and treated with hydrochloric acid and the original sediment extract. It represents the ratio of chlorophyll and its degradation products deposited in the sediments that could still be chemically transformed and those that are inert to chemical attack. The ratio is lower in sediments that include freshly deposited phytoplankton material and higher in older, more degraded sediments. We measured this new parameter on surface sediments, and sediments from several short and a long sediment core from different oceanic settings. CI values range from 0.2 for chlorophyll a to 0.36–0.56 for fresh material deposited on the shelf off Namibia to values around 0.67 in sediments off Chile and Peru to values up to 0.97 for sediments in a deep core from the northeastern slope of the Arabian Sea. We have compared the CI to rates of bacterial sulfate reduction, as a direct measure of organic matter reactivity and to other degradation indices based on amino acid composition. We conclude that the CI is a reliable and simple tool for the characterization of organic material freshness in sediments in respect to its degradation state.