English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Successional development of sulfate-reducing bacterial populations and their activities in an activated sludge immobilized agar gel film

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons210740

Santegoeds,  C. M.
Permanent Research Group Microsensor, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210257

de Beer,  D.
Permanent Research Group Microsensor, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Okabe, S., Santegoeds, C. M., Watanabe, Y., & de Beer, D. (2002). Successional development of sulfate-reducing bacterial populations and their activities in an activated sludge immobilized agar gel film. Biotechnology and Bioengineering, 78(2), 119-130.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-D319-5
Abstract
A combination of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), microprofiles, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA fragments followed by hybridization analysis with specific probes was applied to investigate successional development of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) community structure and in situ sulfide production activity within an activated sludge immobilized agar gel film. In this model biofilm system, since biases arising from biofilm heterogeneity can be ignored, the population dynamics of SRB in the agar gel is directly related to physiological capability and in situ activity of SRB. Microelectrode measurements showed that an anoxic zone was already developed at the beginning (0 day), a first sulfide production of 0.054 mumol H2S (m-)2 s(-1) was detected during the first week, and the rate increased gradually to 0.221 mumol H2S m(-2) s(-1) in the fifth week. The most active sulfide production zone moved upward to the chemocline and intensified with time to form a narrow zone with high volumetric sulfide production rates. This result coincided with the shift of the spatial distributions of SRB populations determined by FISH. In situ hybridization with probe SRB385 for mainly general SRB of the delta Proteobacteria plus some gram-positive bacteria and probe 660 for Desulfobulbus indicated that the most abundant populations of SRB were primarily restricted to near the oxic/anoxic interface (chemocline). A close observation of the development of the vertical distributions of SRB populations revealed that the cell numbers of Desulfobulbus tripled (from 0.5 x 10(8) to 1.5 x 108 cells cm(-3)) near the oxic/anoxic interface. Similar growth (from 1.0 x 10(8) to 4.5 x 10(8) cells cm(-3)) of Desulfovibrio-like SRB that hybridized with probe SRB385 was observed. PCR-DGGE followed by hybridization analysis revealed that one Desulfobulbus strain was detected from the beginning, and another strain appeared after 1 week, coinciding with the first detected sulfide production. In addition, three strains hybridizing with probe 687 (possibly Desulfovibrio) were also dominant SRB in the agar gel. (C) 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.