English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Microheterogeneity in 16S ribosomal DNA-defined bacterial populations from a stratified planktonic environment is related to temporal changes and to ecological adaptations

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons210312

Casamayor,  E. O.
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210624

Muyzer,  G.
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210230

Amann,  R.
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

Casamayor2.pdf
(Publisher version), 761KB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Casamayor, E. O., Pedros-Alio, C., Muyzer, G., & Amann, R. (2002). Microheterogeneity in 16S ribosomal DNA-defined bacterial populations from a stratified planktonic environment is related to temporal changes and to ecological adaptations. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 68(4), 1706-1714.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-D321-B
Abstract
Temporal changes of the bacterioplankton from a meromictic lake (Lake Vilar, Banyoles, Spain) were analyzed with four culture- independent techniques: epifluorescence microscopy, PCR- denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting, fluorescence in situ whole-cell hybridization and flow cytometry sorting. Microscopically, blooms of one cyanobacterium (Synechococcus sp.-like), one green sulfur bacterium (Chlorobium phaeobacteroides-like), and one purple sulfur bacterium (Thiocystis minor-like) were observed at different depths and times. DGGE retrieved these populations and, additionally, populations related to the Cytophaga- Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum as predominant community members. The analyses of partial 16S ribosomal DNA sequences from the DGGE fingerprints (550 bp analyzed) revealed higher genetic diversity than expected from microscopic observation for most of these groups. Thus, the sequences of two Synechococcus spp. (both had a similarity of 97% to Synechococcus sp. strain PCC6307 in 16S rRNA), two Thiocystis spp. (similarities to Thiocystis minor of 93 and 94%, respectively), and three Cytophaga spp. (similarities to Cytophaga fermentans of 88 and 89% and to Cytophaga sp. of 93%, respectively) were obtained. The two populations of Synechococcus exhibited different pigment compositions and temporal distributions and their 16S rRNA sequences were 97.3% similar. The two Thiocystis populations differed neither in pigment composition nor in morphology, but their 16S rRNA sequences were only 92.3% similar and they also showed different distributions over time. Finally, two of the Cytophaga spp. showed 96.2% similarity between the 16S rRNA, sequences, but one of them was found to be mostly attached to particles and only in winter. Thus, the identity of the main populations changed over time, but the function of the microbial guilds was maintained. Our data showed that temporal shifts in the identity of the predominant population is a new explanation for the environmental 16S rRNA microdiversity retrieved from microbial assemblages and support the hypothesis that clusters of closely related 16S rRNA environmental sequences may actually represent numerous closely related, yet ecologically distinct, populations.