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Journal Article

Structure of the Human Mitochondrial Ribosome Studied In Situ by Cryoelectron Tomography

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Pfeffer,  Stefan
Baumeister, Wolfgang / Molecular Structural Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Förster,  Friedrich
Baumeister, Wolfgang / Molecular Structural Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Englmeier, R., Pfeffer, S., & Förster, F. (2017). Structure of the Human Mitochondrial Ribosome Studied In Situ by Cryoelectron Tomography. Structure, 25(10), 1574-1581. doi:10.1016/j.str.2017.07.011.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-0C39-3
Abstract
Mitochondria maintain their own genome and its corresponding protein synthesis machine, the mitochondrial ribosome (mitoribosome). Mitoribosomes primarily synthesize highly hydrophobic proteins of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Recent studies revealed the complete structure of the isolated mammalian mitoribosome, but its mode of membrane association remained hypothetical. In this study, we used cryoelectron tomography to visualize human mitoribosomes in isolated mitochondria. The subtomogram average of themembrane-associated human mitoribosome reveals a single major contact site with the inner membrane, mediated by the mitochondria-specific protein mL45. A second rRNA-mediated contact site that is present in yeast is absent in humans, resulting in a more variable association of the human mitoribosome with the inner membrane. Despite extensive structural differences of mammalian and fungal mitoribosomal structure, the principal organization of peptide exit tunnel and the mL45 homolog remains invariant, presumably to align the mitoribosome with the membrane-embedded insertion machinery.