English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Artificial hagfish protein fibers with ultra-high and tunable stiffness

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons211345

Horbelt,  Nils
Matthew Harrington, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons121387

Harrington,  Matthew J.
Matthew Harrington, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Fu, J., Guerette, P. A., Pavesi, A., Horbelt, N., Lim, C. T., Harrington, M. J., et al. (2017). Artificial hagfish protein fibers with ultra-high and tunable stiffness. Nanoscale, 9(35), 12908-12915. doi:10.1039/C7NR02527K.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-17A7-7
Abstract
Stiff fibers are used as reinforcing phases in a wide range of high-performance composite materials. Silk is one of the most widely studied bio-fibers, but alternative materials with specific advantages are also being explored. Among these, native hagfish (Eptatretus stoutii) slime thread is an attractive protein-based polymer. These threads consist of coiled-coil intermediate filaments (IFs) as nano-scale building blocks, which can be transformed into extended [small beta]-sheet-containing chains upon draw-processing, resulting in fibers with impressive mechanical performance. Here, we report artificial hagfish threads produced by recombinant protein expression, which were subsequently self-assembled into coiled-coil nanofilaments, concentrated, and processed into [small beta]-sheet-rich fibers by a "picking-up" method. These artificial fibers experienced mechanical performance enhancement during draw-processing. We exploited the lysine content to covalently cross-link the draw-processed fibers and obtained moduli values (E) in tension as high as [similar]20 GPa, which is stiffer than most reported artificial proteinaceous materials.