English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Analysis of multiple scattering contributions in electron-impact ionization of molecular hydrogen

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons30934

Ren,  Xueguang
Division Prof. Dr. Thomas Pfeifer, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101889

Hossen,  Khokon
Division Prof. Dr. Thomas Pfeifer, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons30419

Dorn,  Alexander
Division Prof. Dr. Thomas Pfeifer, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Ren, X., Hossen, K., Wang, E., Pindzola, M. S., Dorn, A., & Colgan, J. (2017). Analysis of multiple scattering contributions in electron-impact ionization of molecular hydrogen. Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, 50: 204002. doi:10.1088/1361-6455/aa8b4a.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-8AB9-0
Abstract
We report a combined experimental and theoretical study on the low-energy (E0 = 31.5 eV) electron-impact ionization of molecular hydrogen (H2). Triple differential cross sections are measured for a range of fixed emission angles of one outgoing electron between θ1 =-70° and −130° covering the full 4π solid angle of the second electron. The energy sharing of the outgoing electrons varies from symmetric (E1=E2 =8 eV) to highly asymmetric (E1 = 1 eV and E2 = 15 eV). In addition to the binary and recoil lobes, a structure is observed perpendicular to the incoming beam direction which is due to multiple scattering of the projectile inside the molecular potential. The absolutely normalized experimental cross sections are compared with results from the time-dependent close-coupling (TDCC) calculations. Molecular alignment dependent TDCC results demonstrate that these structures are only present if the molecule axis is lying in the scattering plane.