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Journal Article

Photo-induced radical polarization and liquid-state dynamic nuclear polarization using fullerene nitroxide derivatives.

MPS-Authors
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Liu,  G.
Research Group of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Liou,  S. H.
Research Group of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons130234

Enkin,  N.
Research Group of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Tkach,  I.
Research Group of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Bennati,  M.
Research Group of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Fulltext (public)

2505491.pdf
(Publisher version), 3MB

Supplementary Material (public)

2505491_Suppl.pdf
(Supplementary material), 632KB

Citation

Liu, G., Liou, S. H., Enkin, N., Tkach, I., & Bennati, M. (2017). Photo-induced radical polarization and liquid-state dynamic nuclear polarization using fullerene nitroxide derivatives. Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 19(47), 31823-31829. doi:10.1039/c7cp06073d.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-56B8-5
Abstract
We report on radical polarization and optically-driven liquid DNP using nitroxide radicals functionalized by photoexcitable fullerene derivatives. Pulse laser excitation of the fullerene moiety leads to transient nitroxide radical polarization that is one order of magnitude larger than that at the Boltzmann equilibrium. The life time of the radical polarization increases with the size of the fullerene derivative and is correlated with the electronic spin-lattice relaxation time T1e. Overhauser NMR signal enhancements of toluene solvent protons were observed under steady-state illumination, which replaced microwave irradiation.