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Comprehensive genome-wide classification reveals that many plant-specific transcription factors evolved in streptophyte algae

MPG-Autoren
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Ullrich,  Kristian K.
Department Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Wilhelmsson, P. K. I., Mühlich, C., Ullrich, K. K., & Rensing, S. A. (2017). Comprehensive genome-wide classification reveals that many plant-specific transcription factors evolved in streptophyte algae. Genome Biology and Evolution, evx258. doi:10.1093/gbe/evx258.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-89F1-9
Zusammenfassung
Plant genomes encode many lineage-specific, unique transcription factors. Expansion of such gene families has been previously found to coincide with the evolution of morphological complexity, although comparative analyses have been hampered by severe sampling bias. Here, we make use of the recently increased availability of plant genomes. We have updated and expanded previous rule sets for domain-based classification of transcription associated proteins (TAPs), comprising transcription factors and transcriptional regulators. The genome-wide annotation of these protein families has been analyzed and made available via the novel TAPscan web interface. We find that many TAP families previously thought to be specific for land plants actually evolved in streptophyte (charophyte) algae; 26 out of 36 TAP family gains are inferred to have occurred in the common ancestor of the Streptophyta (uniting the land plants – Embryophyta – with their closest algal relatives). In contrast, expansions of TAP families were found to occur throughout streptophyte evolution. 17 out of 76 expansion events were found to be common to all land plants and thus probably evolved concomitant with the water-to-land-transition.