Deutsch
 
Benutzerhandbuch Datenschutzhinweis Impressum Kontakt
  DetailsucheBrowse

Datensatz

DATENSATZ AKTIONENEXPORT

Freigegeben

Zeitschriftenartikel

The photoinduced dynamics of X[M(dmit)2]2 salts

MPG-Autoren
/persons/resource/persons136032

Hayes,  Stuart A.
Miller Group, Atomically Resolved Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;
Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, University of Hamburg;

/persons/resource/persons136024

Miller,  R. J. Dwayne
Miller Group, Atomically Resolved Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;
Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, University of Hamburg;
Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Toronto;

Externe Ressourcen
Volltexte (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Volltexte verfügbar
Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Ergänzenden Materialien verfügbar
Zitation

Ishikawa, T., Hayes, S. A., Miller, R. J. D., Hada, M., & Koshihara, S. (2017). The photoinduced dynamics of X[M(dmit)2]2 salts. Physica Scripta, 92(3): 034005. doi:10.1088/1402-4896/aa54c3.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-96AF-7
Zusammenfassung
We review our work on the photoinduced dynamics of X[M(dmit)2]2 salts in the charge-separated (CS) phase from the viewpoints of both electronic structural change and lattice or molecular structural change. The driving force for the CS phase formation is a strong correlation among the charge distribution, orbital energies, and the molecular structure; this is in contrast to frequently studied charge-ordered systems such as EDOTTF2PF6, whose formation is mainly driven by the intersite Coulomb repulsion. Despite the localized nature of the structural component, the cooperativity inherent to the crystal is likely to play an important role in photoinduced phenomena. In this review, we summarize the results obtained by a series of optical pump-probe experiments on this class of materials. We have also recently extended these studies using ultrafast electron diffraction to follow the nuclear motion in one of these systems. Such information is crucial for a full understanding of the photoinduced phenomena and it is anticipated that combining the results of the optical and diffraction studies will lead to more fruitful insight than either technique can offer in isolation.