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Expression and function of the zinc finger transcription factor Sp6-9 in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum.

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Königsmann,  T.
Research Group of Molecular Organogenesis, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Königsmann, T., Turetzek, N., Pechmann, M., & Prpic, N. M. (2017). Expression and function of the zinc finger transcription factor Sp6-9 in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum. Development Genes and Evolution, 227(6), 389-400. doi:10.1007/s00427-017-0595-2.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-8FC8-2
Abstract
Zinc finger transcription factors of the Sp6–9 group are evolutionarily conserved in all metazoans and have important functions in, e.g., limb formation and heart development. The function of Sp6–9-related genes has been studied in a number of vertebrates and invertebrates, but data from chelicerates (spiders and allies) was lacking so far. We have isolated the ortholog of Sp6–9 from the common house spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum and the cellar spider Pholcus phalangioides. We show that the Sp6–9 gene in these spider species is expressed in the developing appendages thus suggesting a conserved role in limb formation. Indeed, RNAi with Sp6–9 in P. tepidariorum leads not only to strong limb defects, but also to the loss of body segments and head defects in more strongly affected animals. Together with a new expression domain in the early embryo, these data suggest that Sp6–9 has a dual role P. tepidariorum. The early role in head and body segment formation is not known from other arthropods, but the role in limb formation is evolutionarily highly conserved.