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Closing the energy balance using a canopy heat capacity and storage concept – a physically based approach for the land component JSBACHv3.11

MPG-Autoren

Heidkamp,  Marvin
Boundary Layer Measurements, The Land in the Earth System, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;
IMPRS on Earth System Modelling, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;

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Chlond,  Andreas
Boundary Layer Measurements, The Land in the Earth System, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;

Ament,  Felix
Boundary Layer Measurements, The Land in the Earth System, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;

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gmd-11-3465-2018.pdf
(Verlagsversion), 6MB

Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)

gmd-11-3465-2018-supplement.zip
(Ergänzendes Material), 11MB

Zitation

Heidkamp, M., Chlond, A., & Ament, F. (2018). Closing the energy balance using a canopy heat capacity and storage concept – a physically based approach for the land component JSBACHv3.11. Geoscientific Model Development, 11, 3465-3479. doi:10.5194/gmd-11-3465-2018.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-26B6-7
Zusammenfassung
Land surface–atmosphere interaction is one of the most important characteristic for understanding the terrestrial climate system, as it determines the exchange fluxes of energy and water between the land and the overlying air mass. In several current climate models, it is common practice to use an unphysical approach to close the surface energy balance within the uppermost soil layer with finite thickness and heat capacity. In this study, a different approach is investigated by means of a physically based estimation of the canopy heat storage (SkIn+). Therefore, as a first step, results of an offline simulation of the land component JSBACH of the Max Planck Institute Earth system model (MPI-ESM) – constrained with atmospheric observations – are compared to energy fluxes and water fluxes derived from eddy covariance measurements observed at the CASES-99 field experiment in Kansas, where shallow vegetation prevails. This comparison of energy and evapotranspiration fluxes with observations at the site-level provides an assessment of the model's capacity to correctly reproduce the diurnal cycle. Following this, a global coupled land–atmosphere experiment is performed using an AMIP (Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project) type simulation over 30 years to evaluate the regional impact of the SkIn+ scheme on a longer timescale, in particular, with respect to the effect of the canopy heat storage. The results of the offline experiment show that SkIn+ leads to a warming during the day and to a cooling at night relative to the old reference scheme, thereby improving the performance in the representation of the modeled surface fluxes on diurnal timescales. In particular: nocturnal heat releases unrealistically destroying the stable boundary layer disappear and phase errors are removed. On the global scale, for regions with no or low vegetation and a pronounced diurnal cycle, the nocturnal cooling prevails due to the fact that stable conditions at night maintain the delayed response in temperature, whereas the daytime turbulent exchange amplifies it. For the tropics and boreal forests as well as high latitudes, the scheme tends to warm the system.