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Experimental realization of an absolute single-photon source based on a single nitrogen vacancy center in a nanodiamond

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Chu,  Xiao-Liu
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Gotzinger,  Stephan
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Sandoghdar,  Vahid
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Rodiek, B., Lopez, M., Hofer, H., Porrovecchio, G., Smid, M., Chu, X.-L., et al. (2017). Experimental realization of an absolute single-photon source based on a single nitrogen vacancy center in a nanodiamond. Optica, 4, 71-76. doi:10.1364/OPTICA.4.000071.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-7DD1-8
Abstract
We report on the experimental realization of an absolute single-photon source based on a single nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in a nanodiamond at room temperature and on the calculation of its absolute spectral photon flux from experimental data. The single-photon source was calibrated with respect to its photon flux and its spectral photon rate density. The photon flux was measured with a low-noise silicon photodiode traceable to the primary standard for optical flux, taking into account the absolute spectral power distribution using a calibrated spectroradiometer. The optical radiant flux is adjustable from 55 fW, which is almost the lowest detection limit for the silicon photodiode, and 75 fW, which is the saturation power of the NV center. These fluxes correspond to total photon flux rates between 190,000 photons per second and 260,000 photons per second, respectively. The single-photon emission purity is indicated by a g((2))(0) value, which is between 0.10 and 0.23, depending on the excitation power. To our knowledge, this is the first single-photon source absolutely calibrated with respect to its absolute optical radiant flux and spectral power distribution, traceable to the corresponding national standards via an unbroken traceability chain. The prospects for its application, e.g., for the detection efficiency calibration of single-photon detectors as well as for use as a standard photon source in the low photon flux regime, are promising. (C) 2017 Optical Society of America