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Journal Article

Tunable geometrical frustration in magnonic vortex crystals

MPS-Authors
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Hänze,  M.
Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569, Stuttgart, Germany;
Dynamics of Nanoelectronic Systems, Independent Research Groups, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;

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Schulte,  B.
Quantum Condensed Matter Dynamics, Condensed Matter Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;

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Meier,  G.
The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761, Hamburg, Germany.;
Ultrafast Electronics, Scientific Service Units, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;

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Fulltext (public)

s41598-017-17480-1.pdf
(Publisher version), 2MB

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Citation

Behncke, C., Adolff, C. F., Wintz, S., Hänze, M., Schulte, B., Weigand, M., et al. (2018). Tunable geometrical frustration in magnonic vortex crystals. Scientific Reports, 8: 186. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-17480-1.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-18A1-F
Abstract
A novel approach to investigate geometrical frustration is introduced using two-dimensional magnonic vortex crystals. The frustration of the crystal can be manipulated and turned on and off dynamically on the timescale of milliseconds. The vortices are studied using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy and ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy. They are arranged analogous to the nanomagnets in artificial spin-ice systems. The polarization state of the vortices is tuned in a way that geometrical frustration arises. We demonstrate that frustrated polarization states and non-frustrated states can be tuned to the crystal by changing the frequency of the state formation process.