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Journal Article

The evolution of modern human brain shape

MPS-Authors
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Neubauer,  Simon       
Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Hublin,  Jean-Jacques       
Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Gunz,  Philipp       
Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Neubauer_The-evolution_SciAdvan_2018.pdf
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Citation

Neubauer, S., Hublin, J.-J., & Gunz, P. (2018). The evolution of modern human brain shape. Science Advances, 4(1): eaao5961. doi:10.1126/sciadv.aao5961.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-3A8B-3
Abstract
Modern humans have large and globular brains that distinguish them from their extinct Homo relatives. The characteristic globularity develops during a prenatal and early postnatal period of rapid brain growth critical for neural wiring and cognitive development. However, it remains unknown when and how brain globularity evolved and how it relates to evolutionary brain size increase. On the basis of computed tomographic scans and geometric morphometric analyses, we analyzed endocranial casts of Homo sapiens fossils (N = 20) from different time periods. Our data show that, 300,000 years ago, brain size in early H. sapiens already fell within the range of present-day humans. Brain shape, however, evolved gradually within the H. sapiens lineage, reaching present-day human variation between about 100,000 and 35,000 years ago. This process started only after other key features of craniofacial morphology appeared modern and paralleled the emergence of behavioral modernity as seen from the archeological record. Our findings are consistent with important genetic changes affecting early brain development within the H. sapiens lineage since the origin of the species and before the transition to the Later Stone Age and the Upper Paleolithic that mark full behavioral modernity.