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Potential role of the viral protease in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 associated pathogenesis

MPG-Autoren
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Shoeman,  Robert L.
Coherent diffractive imaging, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;
Department of Biomolecular Mechanisms, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;
Analytical Protein Biochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Shoeman, R. L., Höner, B., Mothes, E., & Traub, P. (1992). Potential role of the viral protease in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 associated pathogenesis. Medical Hypotheses, 37(3), 137-150. doi:10.1016/0306-9877(92)90071-J.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-6051-8
Zusammenfassung
Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) results in a variety of pathological changes culminating in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). While most of these changes can readily be accounted for either by direct effects of HIV-1 on the immune system or by indirect effects of secondary infectious agents as a result of faulty immune surveillance, the direct cause for a number of disease states, including some neuropathies, myopathies, nephropathy, thrombocytopenia, wasting syndromes and increased incidence of cancers (primarily lymphoma) has remained an enigma. We have recently shown that the HIV-1 protease, a viral encoded enzyme necessary for virus maturation and infectivity, can cleave a variety of host cell cytoskeletal proteins in vitro. Potential substrates for the HIV-1 protease are found in all of the cell types affected in these unexplained diseases. Recent proposals suggest that elements of the cytoskeleton may play an important role in the regulation of large scale genetic regulation. We propose that some of the degenerative changes associated with infection by HIV-1 are a direct consequence of cleavage of host cell cytoskeletal proteins, which in turn may be responsible for the increased incidence of cancer in HIV-1 infected individuals as a result of the perturbation of the regulation of gene expression by cytoskeletal components.