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Neural correlates of infants’ sensitivity to vocal expressions of peers

MPG-Autoren
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Missana,  Manuela
Department of Early Child Development and Culture, University of Leipzig, Germany;
Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Altvater-Mackensen,  Nicole
Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Grossmann,  Tobias
Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA;

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Missana_Altvater-Mackensen_2017.pdf
(Verlagsversion), 373KB

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Zitation

Missana, M., Altvater-Mackensen, N., & Grossmann, T. (2017). Neural correlates of infants’ sensitivity to vocal expressions of peers. Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, 26, 39-44. doi:10.1016/j.dcn.2017.04.003.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-62BA-0
Zusammenfassung
Responding to others’ emotional expressions is an essential and early developing social skill among humans. Much research has focused on how infants process facial expressions, while much less is known about infants’ processing of vocal expressions. We examined 8-month-old infants’ processing of other infants’ vocalizations by measuring event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to positive (infant laughter), negative (infant cries), and neutral (adult hummed speech) vocalizations. Our ERP results revealed that hearing another infant cry elicited an enhanced negativity (N200) at temporal electrodes around 200 ms, whereas listening to another infant laugh resulted in an enhanced positivity (P300) at central electrodes around 300 ms. This indexes that infants’ brains rapidly respond to a crying peer during early auditory processing stages, but also selectively respond to a laughing peer during later stages associated with familiarity detection processes. These findings provide evidence for infants’ sensitivity to vocal expressions of peers and shed new light on the neural processes underpinning emotion processing in infants.