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Journal Article

Characterization of infectious and defective cloned avian hepadnavirus genomes

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Sprengel,  Rolf
Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;
Rolf Sprengel Group, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;
Olfaction Web, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Wildner, G., Fernholz, D., Sprengel, R., Schneider, R., & Will, H. (1991). Characterization of infectious and defective cloned avian hepadnavirus genomes. Virology, 185(1), 345-353. doi:10.1016/0042-6822(91)90782-7.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-62E1-3
Abstract
The infectivity in vivo, replication competence in vitro, and expression of viral genes of several molecularly cloned duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) genomes were investigated. In addition, replication competence, core protein expression, and secretion of viral proteins were investigated for a grey heron hepatitis B virus genome. Except two, all DHBV isolates tested induced a systemic infection in Pekin ducks when injected as cloned viral DNA into the liver. After transfection of chicken hepatoma cells, both defective DHBV genomes expressed intracellular nucleocapsid and pre-S envelope proteins and secreted DHBs/pre-S particles into the medium. One of the defective DHBV genomes and HHBV produced within the cells replicative intermediates encapsidated in core particles and secreted virions, whereas the other defective DHBV genome did not and was unable to efficiently encapsidate the RNA pregenome. Comparative sequence analysis was performed to identify potential amino acid changes in viral proteins of both defective DHBV genomes. The data obtained demonstrate that most cloned avian hepadnaviruses are infectious or replication competent and suggest defects in envelope, polymerase or encapsidation function, respectively, in two cloned DHBV genomes.