English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Thermal infrared and optical photometry of Asteroidal Comet C/2002 CE10

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons103839

Böhnhardt,  Hermann
MPI for Aeronomy, Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max Planck Society;
Department Planets and Comets, Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Sekiguchi, T., Miyasaka, S., Dermawan, B., Mueller, T., Takato, N., Watanabe, J., et al. (2018). Thermal infrared and optical photometry of Asteroidal Comet C/2002 CE10. Icarus, 304, 95-100. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2017.12.037.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-BA8C-1
Abstract
C/2002 CE10 is an object in a retrograde elliptical orbit with Tisserand parameter -0.853 indicating a likely origin in the Oort Cloud. It appears to be a rather inactive comet since no coma and only a very weak tail was detected during the past perihelion passage. We present multi-color optical photometry, lightcurve and thermal mid-IR observations of the asteroidal comet. With the photometric analysis in BVRI, the surface color is found to be redder than asteroids, corresponding to cometary nuclei and TNOs/Centaurs. The time-resolved differential photometry supports a rotation period of 8.19  ±  0.05 h. The effective diameter and the geometric albedo are 17.9  ±  0.9 km and 0.03  ±  0.01, respectively, indicating a very dark reflectance of the surface. The dark and redder surface color of C/2002 CE10 may be attribute to devolatilized material by surface aging suffered from the irradiation by cosmic rays or from impact by dust particles in the Oort Cloud. Alternatively, C/2002 CE10 was formed of very dark refractory material originally like a rocky planetesimal. In both cases, this object lacks ices (on the surface at least). The dynamical and known physical characteristics of C/2002 CE10 are best compatible with those of the Damocloids population in the Solar System, that appear to be exhaust cometary nucleus in Halley-type orbits. The study of physical properties of rocky Oort cloud objects may give us a key for the formation of the Oort cloud and the solar system.