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Neurobiology of knowledge and misperception of lyrics

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Erb,  M
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Scheffler,  K
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Beck Lidén, C., Krüger, O., Schwarz, L., Erb, M., Kardatzki, B., Scheffler, K., et al. (2016). Neurobiology of knowledge and misperception of lyrics. NeuroImage, 134, 12-21. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.03.080.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-79A6-D
Abstract
We conducted two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments to investigate the neural underpinnings of knowledge and misperception of lyrics. In fMRI experiment 1, a linear relationship between familiarity with lyrics and activation was found in left-hemispheric speech-related as well as bilateral striatal areas which is in line with previous research on generation of lyrics. In fMRI experiment 2, we employed so called Mondegreens and Soramimi to induce misperceptions of lyrics revealing a bilateral network including middle temporal and inferior frontal areas as well as anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and mediodorsal thalamus. ACC activation also correlated with the extent to which misperceptions were judged as amusing corroborating previous neuroimaging results on the role of this area in mediating the pleasant experience of chills during music perception. Finally, we examined the areas engaged during misperception of lyrics using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to determine their structural connectivity. These combined fMRI/DWI results could serve as a neurobiological model for future studies on other types of misunderstanding which are events with potentially strong impact on our social life.