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Neuronavigated left temporal continuous theta burst stimulation in chronic tinnitus

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Giani,  A
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group Cognitive Neuroimaging, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Schecklmann, M., Giani, A., Tupak, S., Langguth, B., Raab, V., Polak, T., et al. (2016). Neuronavigated left temporal continuous theta burst stimulation in chronic tinnitus. Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, 34(2), 165-175. doi:10.3233/RNN-150518.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-7A08-F
Abstract
Purpose: Clinical effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in chronic tinnitus are moderate. More precise coil localisation strategies, innovative stimulation protocols, and identification of predictors for treatment response were proposed as promising attempts to enhance treatment efficacy. In this pilot study we investigated neuronavigated continuous theta burst TMS (cTBS). Methods: Twenty-three patients received neuronavigated cTBS over the left primary auditory cortex in a randomized sham-controlled trial (verum = 12; sham = 11). Treatment response was evaluated with tinnitus questionnaires and numeric rating scales. Immediate change in numeric rating scales during the first session was used as predictor for treatment response. Results: Tinnitus was significantly reduced after treatment, but there were no superior effects between verum vs. sham treatment. Immediate change in the first treatment session predicted the response to treatment only in the verum group. Conclusions: In our study, verum cTBS was not superior to sham which highlights the persistent need for improving non-invasive brain stimulation techniques for the treatment of tinnitus. Future research should focus on the transfer of positive single session effects to daily treatment trials.