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Visual processes dominate perception and action during social interactions

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Fademrecht,  L
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Bülthoff,  HH
Project group: Cybernetics Approach to Perception & Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons83877

de la Rosa,  S
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Project group: Social & Spatial Cognition, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Fademrecht, L., Bülthoff, H., & de la Rosa, S. (2016). Visual processes dominate perception and action during social interactions. Poster presented at 39th European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2016), Barcelona, Spain.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-7B3E-2
Abstract
A central question in visual neuroscience concerns the degree to which visual representations of actions are used for action execution. Previously, we have shown that during simultaneous action observation and action execution, visual action recognition relies on visual but not motor processes. This research suggests a primacy of visual processes in social interaction scenarios. Here, we provide further evidence for visual processes dominating perception and action in social interactions. We examined the influence of visual processes on motor control. 16 participants were tested in a 3D virtual environment setup. Participants were visually adapted to an action (fist bump or punch) and subsequently categorized an ambiguous morphed action as either fist bump or punch in three experimental conditions. In the first condition participants responded via key press after having seen the entire test stimulus. In the second, participants responded with carrying out the complementary action after having seen the entire test stimulus. In the third (social interaction condition) participants carried out the complementary action while observing the test stimulus. We found an antagonistic bias of movement trajectories towards the non-adapted action (adaptation aftereffect) only in the social interaction condition. Our results highlight the importance of visual processes in social interactions.