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Downfield spectra of human brain obtained with and without water suppression at 9.4T

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Giapitzakis,  IA
Research Group MR Spectroscopy and Ultra-High Field Methodology, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Avdievich,  N
Research Group MR Spectroscopy and Ultra-High Field Methodology, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Henning,  A
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group MR Spectroscopy and Ultra-High Field Methodology, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Fichtner, N., Giapitzakis, I., Avdievich, N., Henning, A., & Kreis, R. (2016). Downfield spectra of human brain obtained with and without water suppression at 9.4T. Poster presented at 24th Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2016), Singapore.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-7B92-1
Abstract
Ultra high field strengths offer the benefit of higher signal to noise ratio as well as improved separation of metabolites in spectroscopy, which is beneficial for evaluating downfield peaks. In the current work, the metabolite cycling technique is implemented at 9.4T in order to evaluate the downfield part of the human brain spectrum. The 9.4T spectra confirm the 3T findings on exchanging peaks, and indicate that the higher field strength improves metabolite separation, allowing for better quantification of exchanging peaks, which is also of great interest for chemical exchange dependent saturation transfer experiments.