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Meeting Abstract

Map task-related and resting-state Vascular Network Connectivity in Rats and Humans

MPG-Autoren
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He,  Y
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons84145

Pohmann,  R
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Scheffler,  K
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Yu,  X
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

He, Y., Pohmann, R., Scheffler, K., Kleinfeld, D., Rosen, B., & Yu, X. (2016). Map task-related and resting-state Vascular Network Connectivity in Rats and Humans. In 17th Conference of Junior Neuroscientists of Tübingen (NeNa 2016): Neuroscience & Law (pp. 13-13).


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-7C71-6
Zusammenfassung
Functional MRI has been used to map task-related and resting-state brain networks with the assumption that the neurovascular coupling underlay the fMRI signal. Previously, a line-scanning fMRI method was developed to map BOLD and CBV fMRI signal which were primarily located at individual arteriole and venule voxels. It demonstrated that the vascular hemodynamic signal coupled to neural activity could be directly mapped with the single-vessel fMRI method [3]. However, line-scanning fMRI method required massive averaging of the fMRI signal across multiple stimulation on/off blocks which couldn't meet requirements of resting state fMRI. In this work, we implemented the stead-state free precession (SSFP) method to obtain vessel-specific task-related and resting state fMRI signal with vascular specificity in rats. This work established the basic platform to map the BOLD/CBV fMRI-based vascular network connectivity in rats. In addition, to verify and translate the vascular network connectivity, we implemented conventional EPI to visual cortex of human brain in 3T and 9.4T scanners.