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Human navigation in virtual large scale spaces

MPS-Authors
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Meilinger,  T
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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de la Rosa,  S
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Meilinger, T., & de la Rosa, S. (2015). Human navigation in virtual large scale spaces. In 6th Bernstein Sparks Workshop: Multi-modal closed-loop stimulation and virtual realities (pp. 4).


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-8C28-6
Abstract
The Social and Spatial Cognition group at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics employs interactive virtual environments to examine cognitive processes underlying navigation and social interaction. Our research on navigation showed that humans physically walking through complex multi-corridor/-street spaces memorize these spaces within multiple, local reference frames. In case humans also had access to maps as, for example, in their city of residency, they rely on a mapbased reference frames for survey estimates, but on local reference frames for route planning. By having participants learn the same layout by manipulating the learning conditions we showed that separation into multiple reference frames is not driven by active walking or successive visibility of the elements, for example, when walking down multiple streets, but rather by having no common visible reference present during learning. We conclude that humans compartmentalize their surrounding within memory and visual access seems to be the crucial factor of separation.