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Fast and efficient free induction decay MR spectroscopic imaging of the human brain at 9.4 Tesla

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Chadzynski,  GL
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Bause,  J
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Shajan,  G
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Pohmann,  R
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Scheffler,  K
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Ehses,  P
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Chadzynski, G., Bause, J., Shajan, G., Pohmann, R., Scheffler, K., & Ehses, P. (2017). Fast and efficient free induction decay MR spectroscopic imaging of the human brain at 9.4 Tesla. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 78(4), 1281-1295. doi:10.1002/mrm.26539.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-C29C-5
Abstract
Purpose The purpose of this work was to develop a fast and efficient MRSI-FID acquisition scheme and test its performance in vivo. The aim was to find a trade-off between the minimal total acquisition time and signal-to-noise ratio of the acquired spectra. Methods Measurements were performed on a 9.4 Tesla system. Sequence optimization included redesign of water suppression, optimization of the sequence gradients, and improvement of the sampling efficiency by minimizing the read-out time. This resulted in an acquisition time of 2:47 and 22:13 minutes for 2D (TR = 57 ms; 3-mm in-plane resolution) and 3D MRSI (TR = 57 ms; 16 slices; 3-mm isotropic resolution), respectively. Results Despite strong T1 weighting and first-order phase problems, it was possible to obtain spectra of an acceptable quality. The average line width calculated for the tCr peak across the entire field of view was 26.9 ± 9.6 Hz for 2D and 30.0 ± 11.3 Hz for 3D MRSI. In 3D measurements, the percent fraction of voxels fitted with Cramer-Rao lower bounds below 10 was 53.3 ± 4.1, 63.4 ± 8.4, and 81.0 ± 2.9 for Glu, tCr, and tNAA, respectively. Conclusion Considering the typically long duration of high-resolution MRSI, the proposed technique may be of interest for clinical applications and/or studies that focus on following the biochemistry of dynamic processes.