English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

SAR and scan-time optimized 3D whole-brain double inversion recovery imaging at 7T

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons83898

Ehses,  P
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Locator

Link
(Publisher version)

Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Pracht, E., Feiweier, T., Ehses, P., Brenner, D., Roebroeck, A., Weber, B., et al. (2018). SAR and scan-time optimized 3D whole-brain double inversion recovery imaging at 7T. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 79(5), 2620-2628. doi:10.1002/mrm.26913.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-C2BC-1
Abstract
Purpose The aim of this project was to implement an ultra-high field (UHF) optimized double inversion recovery (DIR) sequence for gray matter (GM) imaging, enabling whole brain coverage in short acquisition times ( math formula5 min, image resolution 1 mm3). Methods A 3D variable flip angle DIR turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence was optimized for UHF application. We implemented an improved, fast, and specific absorption rate (SAR) efficient TSE imaging module, utilizing improved reordering. The DIR preparation was tailored to UHF application. Additionally, fat artifacts were minimized by employing water excitation instead of fat saturation. Results GM images, covering the whole brain, were acquired in 7 min scan time at 1 mm isotropic resolution. SAR issues were overcome by using a dedicated flip angle calculation considering SAR and SNR efficiency. Furthermore, UHF related artifacts were minimized. Conclusion The suggested sequence is suitable to generate GM images with whole-brain coverage at UHF. Due to the short total acquisition times and overall robustness, this approach can potentially enable DIR application in a routine setting and enhance lesion detection in neurological diseases.