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The bigger the better: also true for action recognition?

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Fademrecht,  L
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons83840

Bülthoff,  I
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Project group: Recognition & Categorization, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons83877

de la Rosa,  S
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Project group: Social & Spatial Cognition, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Fademrecht, L., Bülthoff, I., & de la Rosa, S. (2017). The bigger the better: also true for action recognition?. Poster presented at 17th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2017), St. Pete Beach, FL, USA.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-C449-1
Abstract
In a previous study, we have investigated action recognition performance in central vision and far visual periphery under close-to-natural conditions, i.e. using moving life-size avatars (Fademrecht, Bülthoff, and de la Rosa 2016). We found a non-linear decline of action recognition performance: recognition performance did not decline significantly up to 45° eccentricity and then declined steadily up to 60° eccentricity. To our best knowledge, such a recognition pattern has not been observed with other stimuli, like objects or faces. However, it is well known that stimulus size positively influences visual recognition performance in the visual periphery. Here, we tested recognition of life-size (30° visual angle) and small (6° visual angle) moving avatars to investigate whether the remarkably good recognition performance in the periphery was simply owed to stimulus size. We find a steeper decline of recognition performance with eccentricity for small stimuli compared to large stimuli. However, accuracy was above chance level up to 75° eccentricity for large stimuli, and up to 60° for small stimuli. These results show a surprisingly high recognition performance for human actions in the visual periphery even when the stimuli are small. Hence, bigger action stimuli are better recognized in far visual periphery, although even for small stimuli recognition performance is remarkable.