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Identify the neural basis of vascular dynamic network connectivity with high-field fMRI

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/persons/resource/persons192829

He,  Y
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons214940

Wang,  M
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons214920

Chen,  X
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons133486

Yu,  X
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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He, Y., Wang, M., Chen, X., & Yu, X. (2017). Identify the neural basis of vascular dynamic network connectivity with high-field fMRI. Poster presented at 25th Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2017), Honolulu, HI, USA.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-C493-C
Abstract
The vascular dynamic network connectivity was detected with the resting-state fMRI in rodent and human brains (abstract: 3115). However, the basis of vascular dynamic connectivity is unclear. Here, the GCaMP6-mediated calcium signal simultaneously detected by fiber optics with fMRI showed slow-freuqncy fluctuation (0.01-0.04Hz) correlated to the single-vessel fMRI signal fluctuation with lead times from 1 to 5 seconds. In addition, the correlation was observed on the slow-frequency oscillation of the power profile of the spontaneous calcium burst spikes with frequency bandwidth of 1-10Hz. Thus, the vascular dynamic network connectivity demonstrates the hemodynamic state changes coupled to the brain state fluctuation.