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Double-Row 16-element Tight-Fit Transceiver Phased Array with High Transmit Performance for Whole Human Brain Imaging at 9.4T

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Avdievich,  N
Research Group MR Spectroscopy and Ultra-High Field Methodology, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Giapitzakis,  I
Research Group MR Spectroscopy and Ultra-High Field Methodology, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Henning,  A
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group MR Spectroscopy and Ultra-High Field Methodology, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Avdievich, N., Giapitzakis, I., & Henning, A. (2017). Double-Row 16-element Tight-Fit Transceiver Phased Array with High Transmit Performance for Whole Human Brain Imaging at 9.4T. Poster presented at 25th Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2017), Honolulu, HI, USA.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-C4AD-0
Abstract
At ultra-high fields (UHF, >7T) a simple increase of the length of a single-row human head transmit (Tx) phased array cannot provide an adequate longitudinal coverage for the whole brain imaging. Multi-row (>2) arrays together with RF shimming have to be used instead. In this work, we constructed a 9.4T (400 MHz) 16-loop double-row transceiver array based on the analytical modeling. We demonstrated that simply by overlapping a very good decoupling can be obtained without additional decoupling strategies. This provides a recipe of a simple, robust, and very Tx-efficient design for parallel transmission and whole brain imaging at UHFs.