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Stepwise optogenetic activation of the rat thalamic nuclei with MRI-guided robotic arm (MgRA)

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons214924

Chen,  Y
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons214931

Pais-Roldán,  P
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons214920

Chen,  X
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons133486

Yu,  X
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Chen, Y., Pais-Roldán, P., Chen, X., & Yu, X. (2017). Stepwise optogenetic activation of the rat thalamic nuclei with MRI-guided robotic arm (MgRA). Poster presented at 25th Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2017), Honolulu, HI, USA.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-C4B7-4
Abstract
An MRI-guided multiple degree-of-freedom robotic arm positioning system is developed to guide the fiber optic insertion inside a small animal MRI scanner. The fiber optic is positioned at different depth in the rat thalamus to deliver light pulses for optogenetic fMRI. The corresponding functional spatial patterns and time courses can be achieved in a stepwise manner. The MgRA positioning system provides an alternative way to study global functional projections by mapping fMRI signals driven optogenetically from different brain nuclei.