English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Application of phase correction to improve the characterization of photooxidation products of lignin using 7 Tesla Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons217736

Luo,  Ruoji
Service Department Schrader (MS), Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons58974

Schrader,  Wolfgang
Service Department Schrader (MS), Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Qi, Y., Luo, R., Schrader, W., & Volmer, D. A. (2017). Application of phase correction to improve the characterization of photooxidation products of lignin using 7 Tesla Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. FACETS, 2, 461-475. doi:10.1139/facets-2016-0069.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-FFCC-C
Abstract
Lignin is the second most abundant natural biopolymer and potentially a valuable alternative energy source for conventional fossil fuels. In this study, Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) in conjunction with phase correction was applied to study photooxidation products of lignin using a 7 Tesla (T) mass spectrometer. The application of 7 T FTICR-MS has often been inadequate for the analysis of complex natural organic matter because of insufficient resolving power as compared with high-field FTICR, which led to incorrect assignments of elemental formulae and discontinuous plots in graphical and statistical analyses. Here, the application of phase correction to the FTICR mass spectra of lignin oxidation products greatly improved the spectral quality, and thus, readily permitted characterization of photooxidation processes of lignin compounds under simulated solar radiation conditions.