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Open-source solutions for SPIMage processing.

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Schmied,  Christopher
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Stamataki,  Evangelia
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Tomancak,  Pavel
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Schmied, C., Stamataki, E., & Tomancak, P. (2014). Open-source solutions for SPIMage processing. Methods in Cell Biology, 123, 505-529.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-05D6-8
Abstract
Light sheet microscopy is an emerging technique allowing comprehensive visualization of dynamic biological processes, at high spatial and temporal resolution without significant damage to the sample by the imaging process itself. It thus lends itself to time-lapse observation of fluorescently labeled molecular markers over long periods of time in a living specimen. In combination with sample rotation light sheet microscopy and in particular its selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) flavor, enables imaging of relatively large specimens, such as embryos of animal model organisms, in their entirety. The benefits of SPIM multiview imaging come to the cost of image data postprocessing necessary to deliver the final output that can be analyzed. Here, we provide a set of practical recipes that walk biologists through the complex processes of SPIM data registration, fusion, deconvolution, and time-lapse registration using publicly available open-source tools. We explain, in plain language, the basic principles behind SPIM image-processing algorithms that should enable users to make informed decisions during parameter tuning of the various processing steps applied to their own datasets. Importantly, the protocols presented here are applicable equally to processing of multiview SPIM data from the commercial Zeiss Lightsheet Z.1 microscope and from the open-access SPIM platforms such as OpenSPIM.