English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Prominent role of prominin in the retina.

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons219212

Gurudev,  Nagananda
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons219160

Florek,  Mareike
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons219079

Corbeil,  Denis
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons219326

Knust,  Elisabeth
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Gurudev, N., Florek, M., Corbeil, D., & Knust, E. (2013). Prominent role of prominin in the retina. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 777, 55-71.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-072E-5
Abstract
Prominin molecules represent a new family of pentaspan membrane glycoproteins expressed throughout the animal kingdom. The name originates from its localization on membrane protrusion, such as microvilli, filopodia, lamellipodia, and microspikes. Following the original description in mouse and human, representative prominin members were found in fish (e.g., Danio rerio), amphibian (Ambystoma mexicanum, Xenopus laevis), worm (Caenorhabditis elegans), and flies (Drosophila melanogaster). Mammalian prominin-1 was identified as a marker of somatic and cancer stem cells and plays an essential role in the visual system, which contributed to increased interest of the medical field in this molecule. Here we summarize recent data from various fields, including Drosophila, which will aid to our understanding of its still elusive function.