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Journal Article

Long-Range Transport of Giant Vesicles along Microtubule Networks.

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Leduc,  Cecile
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Diez,  Stefan
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Schwille,  Petra
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Herold, C., Leduc, C., Stock, R., Diez, S., & Schwille, P. (2012). Long-Range Transport of Giant Vesicles along Microtubule Networks. ChemPhysChem: A European Journal of Chemical Physics and Physical Chemistry, 13(4), 1001-1006.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-084E-0
Abstract
We report on a minimal system to mimic intracellular transport of membrane-bounded, vesicular cargo. In a cell-free assay, purified kinesin-1 motor proteins were directly anchored to the membrane of giant unilamellar vesicles, and their movement studied along two-dimensional microtubule networks. Motion-tracking of vesicles with diameters of 1-3?μm revealed traveling distances up to the millimeter range. The transport velocities were identical to velocities of cargo-free motors. Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we were able to estimate the number of GFP-labeled motors involved in the transport of a single vesicle. We found that the vesicles were transported by the cooperative activity of typically 5-10 motor molecules. The presented assay is expected to open up further applications in the field of synthetic biology, aiming at the in vitro reconstitution of sub-cellular multi-motor transport systems. It may also find applications in bionanotechnology, where the controlled long-range transport of artificial cargo is a promising means to advance current lab-on-a-chip systems.