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The mitotic kinesin-14 Ncd drives directional microtubule-microtubule sliding

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Fink,  Gero
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Reuther,  Cordula
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Diez,  Stefan
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Fink, G., Hajdo, L., Skowronek, K. J., Reuther, C., Kasprzak, A. A., & Diez, S. (2009). The mitotic kinesin-14 Ncd drives directional microtubule-microtubule sliding. Nature Cell Biology, 11(6), 717-723.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-0D9A-4
Abstract
During mitosis and meiosis, the bipolar spindle facilitates chromosome segregation through microtubule sliding as well as microtubule growth and shrinkage. Kinesin-14, one of the motors involved, causes spindle collapse in the absence of kinesin-5 (Refs 2, 3), participates in spindle assembly and modulates spindle length. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these activities are not known. Here, we report that Drosophila melanogaster kinesin-14 (Ncd) alone causes sliding of anti-parallel microtubules but locks together (that is, statically crosslinks) those that are parallel. Using single molecule imaging we show that Ncd diffuses along microtubules in a tail-dependent manner and switches its orientation between sliding microtubules. Our results show that kinesin-14 causes sliding and expansion of an anti-parallel microtubule array by dynamic interactions through the motor domain on the one side and the tail domain on the other. This mechanism accounts for the roles of kinesin-14 in spindle organization.