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Building a high resolution surface-based human head and torso model for evaluation of specific absorption rates in MRI

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Kozlov,  Mikhail
Department Neurophysics (Weiskopf), MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Bazin,  Pierre-Louis
Department Neurophysics (Weiskopf), MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Kalloch,  Benjamin
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Weiskopf,  Nikolaus
Department Neurophysics (Weiskopf), MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Möller,  Harald E.
Methods and Development Unit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Kozlov, M., Bode, J., Bazin, P.-L., Kalloch, B., Weiskopf, N., & Möller, H. E. (2018). Building a high resolution surface-based human head and torso model for evaluation of specific absorption rates in MRI. In 2017 IEEE International Conference on Microwaves, Antennas, Communications and Electronic Systems (COMCAS). doi:10.1109/COMCAS.2017.8244808.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-1C59-D
Abstract
We built four prototypes of high resolution surface-based human head models that can be simulated in a reasonable time by a commercially available frequency domain solver-ANSYS HFSS-and evaluated the influence of cerebrospinal fluid and of the upper part of the human torso on field propagation estimates of traveling wave excitation at 297.2 MHz. Combining neighboring triangular faces located in the same plane into a single one is an approach that achieves simulations of high-resolution human models previously not accessible to tetrahedral-mesh-based solvers. If electrical contact between anatomically connected parts of CSF is correctly considered, CSF was found to partially shield brain tissues from the incident RF field.